The leading blog on nanocellulose

Anni Karppinen

Anni has worked with MFC since 2008, first at the Aalto University and the last two years at Borregaard as a research scientist. In her current work, she concentrates on the analysis of MFC and different technical applications. Her main interest lies in the flow properties and rheology of MFC. Anni has a doctoral degree in Polymer Technology.

Recent Posts

Water holding capacity - how cellulose fibrils does it

By Anni Karppinen 12. December 2017

Water holding capacity, or high water retention value, is often mentioned as a key property of cellulose fibrils. When it is dispersed into water, the fibrils trap water between them and do not release it easily. As a consequence, even rather low concentration of MFC in water has gel-like appearance since the water is not able to flow freely. What is behind this? Let’s try to find out.

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Temaer: MFC

Biodegradability of cellulose fibrils

By Anni Karppinen 5. December 2017

Plastic microparticles found in the environment have gotten a lot of attention lately. Many of the plastics are very durable and do not degrade in a reasonable time in the nature, although today there are also biodegradable plastics available. Small pieces of plastic can be found almost everywhere on the Earth and it is not fully understood what kind of consequences that could have for the human beings and environment. Therefore, replacing non-biodegradable plastics with biodegradable materials in packaging, clothes and cosmetics has high focus right now. Cellulose fibrils come from wood or other natural resources; are they biodegradable? Can they replace non-biodegradable plastic and reduce the amount of microplastics in the environment?

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Temaer: Biodegradability, Environment, New materials

Developing VOC-free formulation with microfibrillated cellulose

By Anni Karppinen 29. August 2017

Governments around the world are pushing industries to reduce their volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. VOCs include very different type of chemicals but they may be dangerous to human health and therefore there is a common desire to reduce the use of them. Health effects vary from eye, nose and throat irritation to causing cancer.

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Temaer: rheology, coating

Why does microfibrillated cellulose tolerate salts so well?

By Anni Karppinen 27. June 2017

Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) differs from many rheology modifiers in that aspect that it can be used in high salinity formulations. The rheology effect comes from entangled fibers and salts do not influence this network as it does when the rheology effect is based on ionic interactions. However, the viscosity and other rheological properties vary slightly as a function of salt concentration. Let’s take a closer look at the reasons behind this.

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Temaer: MFC, rheology, Salts

Research review: Microfibrillated cellulose for bioprinting

By Anni Karppinen 13. June 2017

MFCResearchReviewIllustrationPhoto.jpgThree dimensional (3D) printing and tissue engineering are two fields that are currently developing rapidly and are both exciting technologies on their own. What if you combine them? That creates a new manufacturing process, bioprinting. It is a promising technology that might be the key to the on-demand tissue engineering. Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) or nanocellulosic materials generally have an important role in the development.

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Temaer: MFC, MFC reviews, innovation

What makes microfibrillated cellulose a good oxygen barrier

By Anni Karppinen 4. April 2017

Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) has shown great potential as an oxygen barrier in packaging. This has led to numerous research projects trying to utilize the potential in practice. But how does MFC actually create the barrier towards oxygen?

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Temaer: Barrier properties

What kind of rheological properties are needed in oilfield applications?

By Anni Karppinen 14. March 2017

Oil recovery with all different operations is a fascinating field for a rheologist since so versatile rheological properties are required in the processes. Microfibrillated cellulose has been recognized as potential green, safe rheology modifier for the oil recovery industry. Why is that?

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Temaer: rheology, oilfield

Having trouble of producing stable foams?

By Anni Karppinen 28. February 2017

Making foams, in other words introducing gas in a solid or liquid, is needed in industries like construction, composites, home care and personal care. Solid foam is a clever way to produce lightweight structures and insulation materials, whereas many personal care and detergent formulations are required to form a liquid foam. To produce solid foams, you need a blowing agent which introduces gas bubbles in the solid and a solid (often a polymer) that hardens around them. Liquid foams are mainly created by using surfactants and mixing air in. Earlier on this blog, we have explained how microfibrillated cellulose can be used for creating bubble-free gel coats. Could it also help forming intentional foam structures?

 
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Temaer: MFC, rheology

Why is microfibrillated cellulose translucent and not transparent?

By Anni Karppinen 24. January 2017

From time to time I get comments from people interested in microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) that they cannot dissolve the product, and the formulation remains hazy no matter how much they mix. Alternatively, they ask how low the concentration needs to be to get a transparent formulation. The answer to these questions is that microfibrillated cellulose does not dissolve in water (or in common solvents) which means that it does not make a transparent solution, no matter how much it is mixed or how low concentration is used. There is no need to worry, however; the non-dissolved fibers are the key factor to the interesting behavior of MFC. Let’s look at the translucency of MFC in more detail.

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Temaer: MFC

How to make PESTICIDES more effective?

By Anni Karppinen 6. December 2016

Effective pest control is an essential part of modern food production. Different pesticide products, like herbicides, fungicides, and insecticides, are used to ensure healthy growth of the crop and efficient land use. In addition to the active ingredient in the pesticide, auxiliary components can be added to the pesticide formulation or separately to the spray tank. These auxiliary elements are also called adjuvants, and they are used to ensure the effect of pesticides in different environmental conditions. Typically adjuvants can improve the biological activity of the herbicides by, for instance, reducing spray drift, increasing the wetting of the plant surface or enhancing the uptake of the herbicide into the plant leaves. Let me present two cases where microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) can help to improve the performance of pesticides.

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Temaer: MFC

A blog from Borregaard

Exilva is Borregaard’s innovative new additive within the field of Microfibrillar / Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC). Exilva is a completely natural and infinitely sustainable performance enhancer that improves rheology and stability in product formulations.


Visit www.exilva.com

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