The leading blog on nanocellulose

Water holding capacity - how cellulose fibrils does it

By Anni Karppinen 12. December 2017

Water holding capacity, or high water retention value, is often mentioned as a key property of cellulose fibrils. When it is dispersed into water, the fibrils trap water between them and do not release it easily. As a consequence, even rather low concentration of MFC in water has gel-like appearance since the water is not able to flow freely. What is behind this? Let’s try to find out.

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Temaer: MFC

Montmorillonite Clay (Bentonites) and cellulose fibrils

By Mats Hjørnevik 21. November 2017

Montmorillonite (Bentonite) clay and cellulose fibrils has a lot in common since they both can be used as a rheology modifier in different industries. However, there are also clear distinct differences. I aim to show you how I reflect on these two product technologies, and how you can look for synergies and new innovations when using cellulose fibrils and clay. I will first review the non-soluble nature which is common for these materials and then show how this is reflected in the rheology and stability properties of each. I will also focus my discussion on the bentonite branch of montmorillonite clays due to its similarities with the cellulose fibrils

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Temaer: MFC, temperature, Strength, Stability, pH

Dispersion of Cellulose fibrils – a critical success factor

By Mats Hjørnevik 7. November 2017

Traveling around talking about cellulose fibrils for the past 6 years, has thought me an important lesson; always make sure that people understand how to disperse the fibrils sufficiently. This is really the main factor in gaining the key functionalities from the product. So how can you make sure that you are getting the most out of the cellulose fibrils when you are using it in your formulation? In this article I will give you some guidance and video tool on to how to get this right from the start.

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Temaer: MFC

Can cellulose fibrils increase your factory's productivity?

By Justin Scarpello 10. October 2017

As a new boy in the world of cellulose fibrils, I am steadily getting an overview of what potential users of cellulose fibrils are interested in. The unique combination of properties that cellulose fibrils has is the obvious point most are interested in. In addition, the natural and renewable aspect to the material and the possibility to replace oil-based chemicals is becoming more and more important. But could there be more than that?

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Temaer: MFC, innovation, Sustainability

Surfactants – a tool to tailor surface chemistry of MFC?

By Rebecca Blell 22. August 2017

One of the advantages of cellulosic materials (including nanocellulose and microfibrillated cellulose (MFC)) compared to synthetic materials, is their environmentally friendly profile as well as their biodegradability. This profile is impacted by the number of chemical reactions the product will undergo during the manufacturing process. It would therefore be favorable to obtain desired chemical properties via physical adsorption instead of chemical reactions.

In this blog post, you will find examples on possible effects of surface adsorbed surfactants on cellulosic materials.

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Temaer: MFC, Surfactants

3 things to remember when using MFC in the lab

By Otto Soidinsalo 15. August 2017

Introducing a totally new material or technology to the market can often be challenging. Most people tend to have their favorite products which they know and prefer to work with. The natural way of testing of a new material is to compare it with the current products and apply the existing working routines to the first test runs. In some cases this approach might work but unfortunately in many cases it leads to a failure.

Today we will discuss about the important things that you should keep in mind when taking the first steps into the world of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) and tell you how to gain the full potential out of it.

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Temaer: MFC, innovation

Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) in future advanced wound dressing

By Harald G. Rønneberg 8. August 2017

Wound dressings are advanced materials designed for securing sufficient healing of exterior wounds. These dressings have been around for a while, often containing hydrocolloids to be able to protect and absorb moist as well as increase the wound healing speed.  I will  give you a short overview of what types of wound dressings that are available and how microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) may give a new addition to this field of technology.

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Temaer: MFC

Why does microfibrillated cellulose tolerate salts so well?

By Anni Karppinen 27. June 2017

Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) differs from many rheology modifiers in that aspect that it can be used in high salinity formulations. The rheology effect comes from entangled fibers and salts do not influence this network as it does when the rheology effect is based on ionic interactions. However, the viscosity and other rheological properties vary slightly as a function of salt concentration. Let’s take a closer look at the reasons behind this.

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Temaer: MFC, rheology, Salts

Can I improve the strength of my products by using MFC?

By Mats Hjørnevik 20. June 2017

The ability of nanocellulose and microfibrillated cellulose to provide strength in different products has been discussed and studied for a long time. MFC fibers are strong and lightweight and has large surface area which makes it an excellent candidate for strengthening aid. Some are referring to the composites containing MFC as being “the next world-changing supermaterial” (Gizmodo, 2014), while others believe that they can be part of car production (Financial Post 2017). So how is this actually working?

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Temaer: MFC, Strength, Film

Research review: Microfibrillated cellulose for bioprinting

By Anni Karppinen 13. June 2017

MFCResearchReviewIllustrationPhoto.jpgThree dimensional (3D) printing and tissue engineering are two fields that are currently developing rapidly and are both exciting technologies on their own. What if you combine them? That creates a new manufacturing process, bioprinting. It is a promising technology that might be the key to the on-demand tissue engineering. Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) or nanocellulosic materials generally have an important role in the development.

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Temaer: MFC, MFC reviews, innovation

A blog from Borregaard

Exilva is Borregaard’s innovative new additive within the field of Microfibrillar / Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC). Exilva is a completely natural and infinitely sustainable performance enhancer that improves rheology and stability in product formulations.


Visit www.exilva.com

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