The leading blog on nanocellulose

Developing VOC-free formulation with microfibrillated cellulose

By Anni Karppinen 29. August 2017

Governments around the world are pushing industries to reduce their volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. VOCs include very different type of chemicals but they may be dangerous to human health and therefore there is a common desire to reduce the use of them. Health effects vary from eye, nose and throat irritation to causing cancer.

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Temaer: rheology, coating

Can MFC take your car care products to the next level?

By Scott Mouw 11. July 2017

Can MFC assist formulators of car care products achieve the next level of performance? Can it offer ease of use for consumers and car care professionals, while at the same time using safer, more environmentally friendly additives with a wide range of functionality? I think the answer is yes, and I will show you why.

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Temaer: rheology

Why does microfibrillated cellulose tolerate salts so well?

By Anni Karppinen 27. June 2017

Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) differs from many rheology modifiers in that aspect that it can be used in high salinity formulations. The rheology effect comes from entangled fibers and salts do not influence this network as it does when the rheology effect is based on ionic interactions. However, the viscosity and other rheological properties vary slightly as a function of salt concentration. Let’s take a closer look at the reasons behind this.

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Temaer: MFC, rheology, Salts

MFC and its resistance to heat: Can it create opportunities?

By Mats Hjørnevik 23. May 2017
Microfibrillated cellulose is an interesting rheology additive in several aspects due to its multi-functionalities. It can create pseudoplastic behaviour in flowing systems, prevent cracking of curing systems, improve barrier properties of cured systems, just to name a few opportunities. However, one of its less known characteristics is its ability to perform under a range of different temperatures, without losing the ability to provide the desired viscosity profile. I will in this week’s post focus on how MFC performs at high temperatures in the liquid phases and how it performs in comparison to more well-known rheology additives.
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Temaer: MFC, rheology, temperature, heat

What kind of rheological properties are needed in oilfield applications?

By Anni Karppinen 14. March 2017

Oil recovery with all different operations is a fascinating field for a rheologist since so versatile rheological properties are required in the processes. Microfibrillated cellulose has been recognized as potential green, safe rheology modifier for the oil recovery industry. Why is that?

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Temaer: rheology, oilfield

Having trouble of producing stable foams?

By Anni Karppinen 28. February 2017

Making foams, in other words introducing gas in a solid or liquid, is needed in industries like construction, composites, home care and personal care. Solid foam is a clever way to produce lightweight structures and insulation materials, whereas many personal care and detergent formulations are required to form a liquid foam. To produce solid foams, you need a blowing agent which introduces gas bubbles in the solid and a solid (often a polymer) that hardens around them. Liquid foams are mainly created by using surfactants and mixing air in. Earlier on this blog, we have explained how microfibrillated cellulose can be used for creating bubble-free gel coats. Could it also help forming intentional foam structures?

 
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Temaer: MFC, rheology

How MFC can improve durability and performance of your boat

By Synnøve Holtan 14. February 2017

In my previous blog post, I covered the characteristics of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) and fumed silica as raw materials used for industrial purposes. I focused on how MFC provides a viable alternative to fumed silica in many applications since they both have large surface areas with similar surface active groups. However, the physical network properties of the two materials differ and may lead to new and exciting discoveries in the end products.

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Temaer: MFC, rheology

Microfibrillated Cellulose vs. Fumed silica: characteristics and applications

By Synnøve Holtan 13. December 2016

Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) and fumed silica are both used for controlling the rheology of liquid systems, such as thixotropy and stability, and may be used within the same field of applications giving similar properties. However, there are also profound differences between the two. For example, where MFC is a natural product derived from cellulose-based raw materials, the native hydrophilic fumed silica is an amorphous, colloidal silicon dioxide prepared by a flame hydrolysis process. So why can two such, at first glance, different products be used in similar applications? In this blog post, I will dig more into detail about the two multifunctional additives, and discuss how their similarities and differences may affect application properties.

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Temaer: MFC, rheology

How MFC can improve concrete rheology

By Tania Risson 2. August 2016

Concrete products are a complex mixture of chemicals, fines, and heavy particles. It's always challenging to control the stability, flow and strength of it. Many admixtures have been created to overcome these challenges, often containing synthetically derived performance additives.

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Temaer: MFC, concrete, rheology