The leading blog on nanocellulose

How to use and understand cellulose fibrils? The practical experience from Covestro

By Thomas Marwedel 26. June 2018

Our blog post of the week is today a really exciting one! We have been so fortunate to interview Peter Küker, who is a technical manager at Covestro in Germany. Peter has been working with cellulose fibrils in a project at Covestro for some time, and today he is sharing his views and experience on utilizing the fibrils in some of the Covestro formulations for adhesives. Don't miss out on this opportunity to learn more about the actual experience of utilizing the effect from the fibrils on rheology, dispersion and material handling.

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Temaer: New materials, waterborne, Dispersion, Sustainability, rheology

Looking for a rheology additive for a waterborne system? here are some hints on what to look for (and how to find a bio-based one)

By Mats Hjørnevik 5. June 2018

This week I would like to discuss water-based systems where the challenge is to apply the product effectively on a surface. This can be true for a high number of products ranging from coatings, adhesives, composites (for instance plastics), materials for 3D printing, deicing products and so on. The downstream processing and application of the product is by medium or high shear equipment, meaning either a roller, brush, a spray or the like. This calls for a shear thinning rheology system to stabilize the formulation and give the correct viscosity at each step.

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Temaer: rheology, Flow

The past, present and future of performance coatings: can waterborne systems improve it?

By Mats Hjørnevik 27. March 2018

The performance coatings sector has seen decades of development to protect installations and transportation equipment. The sector has been highly dominated by solvent based systems and these systems have seen incremental innovations for a long period of time. The end-user demands for these systems have been set in a context of a world in an ever-changing environment: high pressure on efficiency, increased globalization and international trade, as well as the period of increased climate focus. So how is this world going to look in the near future? In my attempt to share thoughts on this subject, I will focus on the rheology system, how its currently being solved and how it can be solved with alternative, more environmentally friendly technologies in the future.

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Temaer: New materials, Environment, waterborne, coating, rheology

Topic Tuesday: High temperature stability with cellulose fibrils

By Mats Hjørnevik 30. January 2018

Another episode of Topic Tuesday where we break down the rheological profile of cellulose fibrils under certain conditions. This week we will show you the robustness of your product's rheology profile under different temperatures when using cellulose fibrils.

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Temaer: Topic Tuesday, Video, temperature, rheology, Stability, heat

[VIDEO] Topic Tuesday: Shear thinning properties with cellulose fibrils

By Mats Hjørnevik 19. December 2017

We are back with another Topic Tuesday, and today's easy digestible 4 minutes of fame will introduce you to one of our favorite topics: the rheology behavior of cellulose fibrils. Jump on board, as we dig into the shear thinning properties and show you some real life examples.

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Temaer: Topic Tuesday, Video, rheology

The difference between soluble polymers and cellulose fibrils

By Mats Hjørnevik 24. October 2017

Water soluble polymers have been used for decades, bringing various functionalities to a high number of applications. The reason for their popularity is the ability to being customized by changing molecular weight and molecular chain length, their high efficiency in use (especially the ones with high molecular weight), and their relatively simple handling. However, in certain cases polymeric viscosifiers fail to offer the needed performance and microfibrillated cellulose can offer exactly the desired properties.

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Temaer: Flow, rheology

Developing VOC-free formulation with microfibrillated cellulose

By Anni Karppinen 29. August 2017

Governments around the world are pushing industries to reduce their volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. VOCs include very different type of chemicals but they may be dangerous to human health and therefore there is a common desire to reduce the use of them. Health effects vary from eye, nose and throat irritation to causing cancer.

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Temaer: rheology, coating

Can MFC take your car care products to the next level?

By Scott Mouw 11. July 2017

Can MFC assist formulators of car care products achieve the next level of performance? Can it offer ease of use for consumers and car care professionals, while at the same time using safer, more environmentally friendly additives with a wide range of functionality? I think the answer is yes, and I will show you why.

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Temaer: rheology

Why does microfibrillated cellulose tolerate salts so well?

By Anni Karppinen 27. June 2017

Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) differs from many rheology modifiers in that aspect that it can be used in high salinity formulations. The rheology effect comes from entangled fibers and salts do not influence this network as it does when the rheology effect is based on ionic interactions. However, the viscosity and other rheological properties vary slightly as a function of salt concentration. Let’s take a closer look at the reasons behind this.

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Temaer: MFC, Salts, rheology

MFC and its resistance to heat: Can it create opportunities?

By Mats Hjørnevik 23. May 2017
Microfibrillated cellulose is an interesting rheology additive in several aspects due to its multi-functionalities. It can create pseudoplastic behaviour in flowing systems, prevent cracking of curing systems, improve barrier properties of cured systems, just to name a few opportunities. However, one of its less known characteristics is its ability to perform under a range of different temperatures, without losing the ability to provide the desired viscosity profile. I will in this week’s post focus on how MFC performs at high temperatures in the liquid phases and how it performs in comparison to more well-known rheology additives.
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Temaer: MFC, rheology, temperature, heat