The leading blog on nanocellulose

Topic Tuesday: How to perform with your oil-in- water-emulsion

By Mats Hjørnevik 11. September 2018

Mixing two liquids like oil and water is hard enough. At the same time keeping it stable, adds an additional level of difficulty in this challenge. And how can you reach the best performance on rheology and stability in the making of these emulsions? In this episode of Topic Tuesday, we are discussing the subject of emulsions; what are they, how do they work and how do we make them stable? Grab a coffee and joins us for a video session.

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Temaer: Stability, emulsions, Topic Tuesday

How to avoid unstable formulations

By Rebecca Blell 21. August 2018

Many reasons can lead to unstable formulations when you first start testing a new formulation or a new ingredient. Some are due to non-optimized use of ingredients such as stabilizers and others are due to formulation processing or incompatibilities. Sounds familiar? We might have good news for you.

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Temaer: Stability, compatibility, Cellulose Fibrils

How to counteract formulation settling issues

By Rebecca Blell 14. August 2018

Everyday life is full of formulations containing solid particles, pigments, beads or fillers. Depending on the application, the formulations may have a varying amount of solids. Common challenges with high solid content formulations are the settling of heavy particles or the floating of lighter ones. Therefore, it is important to ensure the stability of the solids suspended in a formulation. Especially those with high particle loading such as a coating formulation with matting agents, UV filters and other solids.

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Temaer: MFC, settlings, Stability, Dispersion, Cellulose Fibrils

Stability of Cellulose fibrils — microbial degradation

By Rebecca Blell 24. April 2018

Cellulose fibrils are most often supplied as readily activated water suspensions. This maintains the product’s performance and makes it easy to incorporate into a formulation. It however brings up questions about the microbial stability of the suspension over time. Is the robustness of Cellulose fibrils enough in this case?

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Temaer: storage, Stability, Biodegradability, Cellulose Fibrils

Temperature stability of cellulose fibrils

By Anni Karppinen 13. February 2018

Typically, when using polymeric rheology modifiers, the viscosity of a formulation decreases with increasing temperature and the polymers can even degrade at higher temperatures. This can cause problems for the manufacturer or user, like instability of the formulation or difficulties in application. Cellulose fibrils and cellulose in general are stable against temperatures up to 200-300 °C, which makes them a good choice when a temperature stable viscosity modifier is needed. Earlier, we have described how you can achieve a stable viscosity in your formulation with cellulose fibrils in the temperature range of 20-90 °C. This time I would like to discuss what happens when we go over 100 °C, either in wet or dry state.

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Temaer: temperature, Stability

Topic Tuesday: High temperature stability with cellulose fibrils

By Mats Hjørnevik 30. January 2018

Another episode of Topic Tuesday where we break down the rheological profile of cellulose fibrils under certain conditions. This week we will show you the robustness of your product's rheology profile under different temperatures when using cellulose fibrils.

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Temaer: rheology, temperature, heat, Stability, Video, Topic Tuesday

Montmorillonite Clay (Bentonites) and cellulose fibrils

By Mats Hjørnevik 21. November 2017

Montmorillonite (Bentonite) clay and cellulose fibrils has a lot in common since they both can be used as a rheology modifier in different industries. However, there are also clear distinct differences. I aim to show you how I reflect on these two product technologies, and how you can look for synergies and new innovations when using cellulose fibrils and clay. I will first review the non-soluble nature which is common for these materials and then show how this is reflected in the rheology and stability properties of each. I will also focus my discussion on the bentonite branch of montmorillonite clays due to its similarities with the cellulose fibrils

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Temaer: MFC, temperature, Strength, Stability, pH

Improving cleaning products: utilizing multifunctionality of cellulose fibrils

By Mats Hjørnevik 31. October 2017

I have been working with cellulose fibrils for over 6 years now, and every day there seems to be new opportunities for this product. It occurred to me the other day that my cleaning product at home contained fairly rough abrasives, enabling me to clean off dirt and stains. In the field of cleaning, this is called “agitation” and is part of the C-H-A-T cleaning formula: Chemical-Heat-Agitation-Time. Could this be something for cellulose fibrils? Let me share with you a couple of my thoughts on where the cellulose fibrils may give you some functionality.

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Temaer: Flow, Surfactants, Stability

What is the effect of MFC on emulsion stability

By Rebecca Blell 19. September 2017

Have you heard the saying “Oil and water don’t mix”? This is a proverb said of things with such different natures that they cannot be combined. It is however not totally true since oil and water can be mixed into an emulsion. In many different industries such as cosmetics, pharma, paints, coatings, household products and many more, professionals mix different oils and water to create the desired performance of a product. They overcome the hurdle of “mixing” oil and water by using emulsifiers, surfactants and stabilizers. So how can MFC contribute?

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Temaer: Stability, emulsions

MFC in cleaners - how to thicken your advanced cleaning products

By Otto Soidinsalo 12. September 2017

Many household and industrial cleaners are strongly alkaline, highly acidic or contain oxidizing agents. This creates challenges when one would like thicken them or to have a gel formulation instead of the corresponding thin liquid version. In many cases, viscous, gel or foam formulations are preferred, as they ensure longer residence time on the vertical surfaces and are also safer to use as they are good at preventing any unwanted splashing. Today we will look at how MFC allows you to manufacture stable gel formulations at low to high pH as well as with oxidizing compounds, such as hydrogen peroxide.

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Temaer: Stability, pH

A blog from Borregaard

Exilva is Borregaard’s innovative new additive within the field of Cellulose fibrils / Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC). Exilva is a completely natural and infinitely sustainable performance enhancer that improves rheology and stability in product formulations.


Visit www.exilva.com

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